Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

General Club Information in the last 180 days - Posts open to Club members only
James Lemke
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:59 am

Re: Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

Post by James Lemke »

Good points Paul.. Thanks.
Don Williams
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:02 pm

Re: Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

Post by Don Williams »

I look to 'target' the I.P. (Initial Point) at 2550 and be at 2350 at mid-field downwind and then 2150 as I turn base and then 1950 as I turn final with my speed stabilized at of before my turn to base. (These altitudes are AGL and related to our field - as our field is about 1550 ASL.) I also do the SWAFTS check sometime on the earlier stage of the downwind leg and perhaps a radio call (positon report) as well. The 'circuit size' is adjusted depending on the wind (velocity and direction) as well as, perhaps, traffic also in the circuit or pattern (either behind or in front of your position.) Steeper approaches are preferred (but not overly so) over shallow approaches. Did I miss anything??!!
Keith Laidlaw
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2020 12:19 pm

Re: Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

Post by Keith Laidlaw »

I sure hope you meant MSL not AGL!!!
Donald Kuehn
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:41 am

Re: Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

Post by Donald Kuehn »

Radio Procedures:
York (Walter's Field) is listed in the Flight Supplement as Arthur. All radio calls should either be to 'Arthur Unicom' when calling the field, or 'Arthur Traffic' when giving your intended procedure for joining the circuit (straight into the downwind, mid cross to join a mid downwind, or a cross over and turnaround to cross the field and join a mid downwind). Because Arthur is an uncontrolled aerodrome it is legal to join a circuit without any radio calls. This is called flying 'Nordo' (no radio). If you believe your radio is not broadcasting you should call that you are flying 'Ronly' (receive only) but continue to make the appropriate calls. Gliders circuits are different than powered AC circuits; they are more compact and there are no go-arounds. Also, many gliders do not have a radio call switch on the stick which makes radio calls a lot more difficult, especially after joining the circuit when both hands are busy with other things (flying, spoilers, flaps, water, and landing gear). My best advise is the following; do your pre-landing checks well before entering any circuit, and they should also include putting the gear down! When you enter the circuit call Arthur Traffic with your entry procedure (Yankee Sierra Kilo joining right downwind runway three two). If there is any traffic ahead of you also announce that you are "number 2, number 3" etc. so the traffic in front of you (and any tow planes also in their circuit) will be made aware that you are there. Don't worry about any other radio calls unless there is a situation (opposing traffic that may not see you, you are changing runways because of congestion, etc.) Your primary task is to fly the airplane. Do not make any calls to 'Walter's Field' because other visiting aircraft in the area won't know who you are calling. Remember - Arthur Unicom when calling the field for an advisory, permission to extend your flight, etc. Arthur Traffic when broadcasting your intentions for entering the aerodrome traffic area, your intended procedure for entering the circuit, and joining the circuit.
There is a great booklet about radio procedures called "VFR Radio Procedures in Canada", published by RMC, INC., email rmc.inc@sympatico.ca. It is available at a lot of local FBO's like the Brampton Flying Club. The cost is about $12.00 +tax. Hope all this helps.
Keith Laidlaw
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jul 01, 2020 12:19 pm

Re: Spring Check-outs - (Flight Review Check List)

Post by Keith Laidlaw »

Thank you, Don. We have had recent discussions about always making the circuit entry calls and I strongly support that. At the very least, good practice for the day you have to bail at another aerodrome, at best mitigate a sticky situation at home field. Sadly, though, not all aircraft have radios including the ones many learn to fly in (2-33). This means students get a bad habit right off the bat.

I love your two suggestions of 1. only calling circuit entry unless circumstances demand and 2. specify number 2, 3 ... if you see traffic ahead.

Now I just have to get in the habit (I learned in 2-33)!
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